Wine & Words for the Holidays

The countdown for that joyous gift-giving season is upon us, the time where presents are purchased and prettily packaged under the tree anxiously awaiting their recipients. However, if you are at all like me, you haven’t started your shopping, and just the thought of visiting a nearby mall makes your anxiety skyrocket more than that time your boss was unknowingly behind you while you were texting. Ooops. Now add in the extra pressure to find that amazing present that silently says, a lot of effort went into finding this gift that oh so perfectly complements your personality, whereas your normal go-to cheap bottle of plonk and lame-o murder mystery novel that simply say I didn’t know what to get you so I picked this up on my way over just won’t cut it anymore.

Have no fear, this wine chugging, I mean loving, bookworm is here to help by pointing you in the right gift-giving direction, but before you go running to the nearby wine store and local bookshop, let’s figure out what type of person you are buying gifts for.

The Flirty Friend
We all know that one person who wins people over by their smile, who bats their eyelashes to get their way and cleverly places a hand on an arm if they want something. Heck, we have even used this friend as bar bait to get free drinks.
Wine: Riesling – Traditionally made on the sweeter side to balance its sharp acidity, riesling is the wine that will make you fall in love. Sweet or dry, you’ll find aromas of citrus blossoms, and taste profiles of apple, lemon and mineral deliciousness.
Book: The Regulars, Georgia Clark

The Au Naturel Friend
This person loves incense, sourcing local ingredients, makes their own deodorant, smells like patchouli and always has a bottle of kombucha on the go.
Wine: Orange wine – Orange wine seems to be the new craze these days, but this winemaking technique has been around for thousands of years. This wine is a bit of a misnomer as it is not made from oranges but from white grapes that are fermented with their skins and seeds with little to no additives (no sugar and yeast, etc.). They taste funky, nutty and sour.
Book: Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, Robert Pirsig

The So Many Feels Friend
This friend loves love, has a dark and provocative side, but is sensitive to their surroundings. They’re sweet, with an added side of just the right amount of sass. This friend may also need a bit of hand-holding throughout life.
Wine: Pinot Noir – Nicknamed the heartbreak grape because it is a challenge to grow; this is a thin-skinned grape making it more susceptible to rot and disease and is very sensitive to fluctuating temperatures, however, when pinot noir is at its best, it is a seductive wine with aromas of red berries and clove.
Book: Milk & Honey, Rupi Kaur

The Badass Friend
This person does not stand for bullsh!t, even though there are times when this friend gets knocked down they always quickly get back up and walk on like a boss.
Wine: Cabernet Franc – Part of the Bordeaux five (cabernet franc, cabernet sauvignon, merlot, malbec, and petit verdot), and parent of cabernet sauvignon (hello, love affair between sauvignon blanc), cabernet franc has just the right amount of tannins and red-fruit characteristics to remind you that this wine is King Queen.
Book: What Happened, Hillary Rodham Clinton

The Vivacious Friend
We all have that one friend who is up for anything and everything; they are the life of the party yet they also have the ability to make everyone feel at ease. People usually gravitate towards this friend because of their effervescent personality and great sense of style.
Wine: Sparkling – This wine is pretty intense, (who are we kidding, so is this friend) in that it is one of the most technical wines to make because it requires two fermentations: one to make the wine and the other to make the bubbles. When buying sparkling wine ask what grape varieties were used to make the wine as typically chardonnay, pinot noir and pinot meunier are the three grape varieties that make up the traditional sparkling wine recipe. Side note: Champagne and sparkling are similar in style but not in name (and price), as wine made outside of Champagne in France cannot be called champagne, hence why bubbly wine made here in Ontario is called sparkling.
Book: The Great Gatsby, F.Scott Fitzgerald

Here’s to happy shopping, yummy imbibing, and good books and most importantly, please drink responsibly and always read adventurously!IMG_5809** Thoughts and opinions in this post are my own and do not reflect those of my employer.**

So many feels

As the days began to darken earlier, so too had my mood, which took an unexpected turn earlier this week mirroring the recent change. I don’t know why, but I’m sure the unnecessary time change, the sugar crash from over-indulging on leftover Halloween candy, and the [my] moon cycle had something to do with it, but this week was blah. Everything was too hard, I was so sad, and I felt alone.

After a few days on this roller coaster of emotions, I decided to confide in a friend about this funk and how to turn my mood around. Her words helped but I still needed to find the inner strength to transform them into an action.

“Every day I have the choice on whether or not I want to be happy and I have to actively choose happiness over sadness. Yeah, there are days when that dark cloud follows me like a shadow, but I’ve learned to embrace that dark cloud and accept it. The difference is that I no longer hate myself on those days I can’t get out of bed, the days I just want to cry, and the days that I don’t want to talk to anyone. I know that those days will pass, eventually, and in a way, those dark cloudy days are my body’s way of telling me to slow down and reset.”

I never thought of it that way, as happiness being a decision we have to continuously choose, I naively assumed happiness just happens, and it probably does, but when it doesn’t happen, on those dark and gloomy days, what do I do?

This question also had me asking “what is happiness?” Is it having it all: house, luxury car, money? Maybe. But what if the house, the car, or the six-plus-digits in the bank account is non-existent, does the mean one is not happy / cannot be happy? What does it even mean to have it all? Maybe having it all isn’t tangible expensive possessions, maybe having it all is simply friends, family, and most importantly, breath, the ability to inhale and exhale every day.

I’m a recreational yogi, I attend a community class at a yoga studio in my neighbourhood once a week, and one thing all of those downward dogs and warriors poses have taught me is the importance of my body working in conjunction with my breath. Some of the poses are impossible for my rigid body, while others are doable, but uncomfortable, and some leave a feeling of sweet sensation on both my physical and mental state – hello, shavasana. The difficulty of each pose affects my breathing, and there are many times I catch myself holding my breath, but it is in that moment when breathing is integral to the pose, and I have to consciously choose to breathe to ease that discomfort.

That dark cloud, the discomfort, and blah-ness of all the feelings, too many feels, crashing down on me at once is invited, but I will hit that internal reset button, I will breathe, and I will choose happiness, be it laughing with friends, taking comfort in the warmth of love from family, and by remembering to inhale and exhale when things get difficult.

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Books that Spook

I love a good festive book that sets the tone for an upcoming holiday, and with today being Halloween, I want to share a list of my favourite books that spook without the scare and gore factor– because who am I kidding, I’m the biggest scaredy-cat around.image1 2Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier
A graphic novel for young readers, this story follows Cat’s family as they move to Bahía de la Luna a foggy village up the California coast. Cat’s sister has cystic fibrosis and needs the sea air as well as a nearby clinic. The new village Cat’s family moves to is obsessed with ghosts; their neighbor gives ghost tours and there’s an annual Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) celebration. What’s more the ghosts that live here are real. A cute read about the relationship between sisters, and the relationship between life and death.

Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke
Where do I begin with this 850 page fictional masterpiece, and its numerous footnotes that assist readers on the contents found within this magical and fastidiously false historical tome? The novel centers around three magicians competing to be England’s best magician. Set in 19th century England where magic is a distant memory of stories and old spell-books, this gothic novel is sure to delight as readers witness three magicians dueling for power. (This novel is one of my all-time favourites!)

Practical Magic by Alice Hoffman
This is a magical, uncanny story that involves ghosts, witches, magical gardens, and black cats. A tale of two sisters, Gillian and Sally Owens, raised by their eccentric aunts in a world of spells, love potions and exotica from which they escape – one by running away and the other by marrying. But everyone knows that you can’t run from magic, or can you?

The Witches of New York by Ami McKay
Somewhat of a sequel to the Virgin’ Cure, The Witches of New York follows three witches, Adelaide, Eleanor and Beatrice as they navigate their magical lives through NYC in the late 1800s. Centuries after the Salem, American witches still quietly reside and young Beatrice is about to become a witch that is made, not born.

Other noteworthy books that spook are Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffenegger.

What are your favourite Halloween reads?

I heart NY

I recently visited New York City (my first time in the City that Never Sleeps!) with my mother- and sisters-in-law for a girls getaway and it was every bit as intoxicating and vibrant as I imagined. Like many, my NYC visions were based from Seinfeld, Sex and the City ,and Friends, but without the Tom’s Restaurant, Mr. Big and phalanges, and as promised by Jay-Z and Alicia Keys, the big lights did indeed inspire me.
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With five girls, a mile-long to-do list, and our eyes on the Big Apple prize, we flew out of Toronto and into New York City. The first hurdle to overcome, which may be easy-peasy for city-born dwellers but for a country bumpkin is terrifying, was the subway system, however, my fears quickly vanished with the purchase of a Presto Card and the help of the Google Maps Subway icon (lifesaver!). After mastering the subway system and gathering our bearings in the Big City, we set off to tackle our to-do list.

What follows is a lively litany of some our NYC stops.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met)
Originally, I was going to abandon the girls and do my own thing, but am so happy I tagged along, as this museum ended up being a highlight of the trip. Admission price is up to you, but the suggested cost is $25. Explore over 5,000 years of art and history through the galleries and exhibitions. Favourites were the panoramic painting of Versailles, the Temple of Dendup, a suit of armour King Henry VIII wore during a battle in 1544 and a collection of paintings by Vincent Van Gogh’s. If I lived in NYC, this place would be a frequently visited spot. IMG_5425Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Admission to the museum is free every Friday night from 4:00 – 9:00 p.m. which made this museum a must-do, and since it was originally on the list (I had to see the Frank Lloyd Wright exhibit and Van Gogh’s “Starry Night”) we opted to save money and visit the museum with the crowds. Highlights were seeing Picasso, Frida Kahlo and Monet’s paintings.
IMG_5426Magnolia Bakery
Three words: It’s worth it! Wait in line, order the banana pudding, thank me later.

Times Square
Our hotel was in Times Square, which made visiting Times Square super accessible, and easy to escape once the crowds got to be too much. Insanity, sensory-overload, Naked Cowboy, just a few things you’ll experience at this must-see (at least once) vibrant attraction.
FullSizeRenderThe Strand Bookstore
A treasure trove for every book lover. This independent books store, established in 1927, is home to 18-miles of books. Here, you will find new books, used books, rare books, out of print books, and more.
IMG_5020Beauty & Essex
A restaurant oozing with 1930s glam. Beauty & Essex is all about exciting your senses, from the entrance (a hidden door in a pawnshop opens to a room with a two-storey chandelier and spiral staircase, where guests are greeted and then seated), to the impressive cocktail list and globetrotting menu. A peacock-themed dining room and a ladies room that serves pink champagne, this place will make you wish you packed a flapper dress and pearls.

New York Public Library
Because you have to! It’s a magnificent building guarded by two marble lions, Patience and Fortitude. Once inside the library, you are transcended into another world as the loud outside noise vanishes, and inside, peace ensues.
IMG_5427Broadway
Seeing a play on Broadway was high on our to-do list, and when we heard that Aladdin was playing at the New Amsterdam Theatre, we quickly bought tickets and were swept away into a whole new world. The play, the actors, the venue, everything was phenomenal.

Central Park
Explore this park on bike – it’s massive! Comprised of 843 acres, Central Park is home to seven man-made lakes, numerous statues, bridges (no two bridges are alike), twenty-one playgrounds, a zoo, a carousel and more. Don’t forget to stop and admire the gardens, as well as shop the local souvenirs that decorate the Mall and Literary Pathway. Pro park tip: Find a park map, it’ll come in handy!
IMG_5188I could go on and on, but alas, this is a city one must experience on their own: It’s eclectic, energetic and everything you think it will be and more, way more!

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

“All her life she had learned that passion, like fire, was a dangerous thing. It so easily went out of control. It scaled walls and jumped over trenches. Sparks leapt like fleas and spread as rapidly; a breeze could carry embers for miles. Better to control that spark and pass it carefully from one generation to the next, like an Olympic torch. Or, perhaps, to tend it carefully like an eternal flame: a reminder of light and goodness that would never – could never – set anything ablaze. Carefully controlled. Domesticated. Happy in captivity.” (161)

Set in Shaker Heights, Ohio during the Clinton era of the ‘90s, Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng centers on the picture perfect Richardson family who live in a perfectly curated neighbourhood and their new enigmatic tenant, Mia and teen daughter, Pearl.

Mia and Pearl are the exact opposite of the Richardson family – the exact opposite of what Shaker Height’s represents – perfection. Mia is an artist and a single-mother, whereas the Richardsons appear to be the epitome of what upper-middle-class families are to represent in Shaker Heights: Mr. Richardson is a partner at his law firm; Mrs. Richardson is a journalist for the local paper, and their four children, two boys and two girls seem to be the ideal children and students. Although, things are not always as they seem to be, but to Pearl, a girl who has moved every year of her life, finds the Richardsons, and the life they comfortably live, enchanting.

Now mix in another upper-middle-class couple, the McCulloughs, who have been desperately trying to build their own family without any luck of their own, announce that they are adopting a Chinese baby that was abandoned at a fire station. The same baby that Mia’s colleague had given up because, at the time, she was unable to provide for her baby, but now wants her back. A custody battle ensues which drastically divide Mia and Mrs. Richardson. Suspicious of Mia’s motives, Mrs. Richardson becomes obsessed to uncover Mia’s secrets, but at a cost that dispels all three families.

In Little Fires Everywhere themes of family, motherhood and politics are predominant, while silent questions of who is fit to be a mother and have a family resonate throughout the novel: is it wealth, age, or a nuclear family structure? This is a beautifully written book, and a powerful story.IMG_5300.JPG

Glamourous Glamping Getaway

I like to think of my partner and I as hardcore campers – a couple that favours weekends in the woods over five-star hotels and room service, but who am I kidding, I need plumbing, electricity and a comfy mattress to survive. So, to celebrate a special occasion with my wannabe-lumberjack hunk, I booked us a stay at Long Point Eco-Adventures where I knew I could experience the best of both worlds.

Located in Norfolk County and just around the corner from Turkey Point Provincial Park, Long Point Eco-Adventures is not just your average stay the night kind of place, this glamping getaway is for the adventure-seekers that want to do a bit more than just lounge by the fire pit. Activities range from zip-lining and axe throwing, to kayaking, fishing, romanc-[ing] under the stars, hiking and more, but don’t make the mistake we did, book your adventure at least one month in advance, as was instructed by one of the staff. However, we did manage to grab a couple of rental mountain bikes and tested out a few trails on and around Turkey Point. I’m not a pro mountain biker, I’m not even a good mountain biker, but you don’t have to be either – although the number of times I fell off of the bike and the four big purple-blue bruises that decorate my thighs beg to differ – the trails are marked as beginner, intermediate, advance, and expert to help you navigate your ride.

After spending your afternoon adventuring, walk across the street to Burning Kiln Winery for a wine tour and wine tasting. Known for their appassimento wines (fancy term for drying harvested grapes to concentrate the sugars and flavours) this winery is situated on a former tobacco tract that pays homage to its history.

Then, relax and unwind in your Wilderness Suite or Pod – these luxury glamping accommodations are unique to the area, and the Wilderness Suites are the only ones in Ontario. We opted to stay in a Wilderness Pod, fitted with a couch, table and two chairs, a bar fridge, a queen-size bed and private washroom. The Wilderness Pod was perfectly cozy for the two of us, but on our next stay, we are definitely staying in one of the Wilderness Suites.IMG_5246

11/22/63 by Stephen King

“She takes my hand like a woman in a dream. She is in a dream, and so am I. Like all sweet dreams, it will be brief…but brevity makes sweetness, doesn’t it? Yes, I think so. Because when time is gone, you can never get it back.”

I can’t remember how I stumbled upon Stephen King’s 11/22/63, it might have been the fact that I read and fell in love with King’s writing style while reading “On Writing” or it might have been because I watched Jackie and afterwards, wanted to learn everything about the Kennedy’s (through fiction, obviously), but whatever the reason I am so happy that I read the 849 page quasi-historical, science-fiction, love story.

Jake Epping, a high school English teacher in Lisbon Falls, Maine and recently divorced, finds himself in a predicament while facing a time-traveling portal that his friend Al Templeton found inside his Diner: Go back in time starting from September 9, 1958 and stop the assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, or remain in the present (June 2011) and constantly face the “what if” question. The portal rules are complicated, but two things remain the same: Trips only last two minutes in present day and every visit is a complete reset. Everything that was accomplished on a previous visit will be instantly erased the next time he returns.

What does Jake do? Of course he travels back in time to place the world back on its proper trajectory, where JFK lives. In 1958 Jake Epping becomes George Amberson, and with the guidance of Al’s notes from his visits to the past, Jake/George is able to live in history. He settles down in a small Texas town, becomes a teacher, falls in love, and tracks the movements of Lee Harvey Oswald.  But, as we are constantly reminded, “history is obdurate” and Jake/George is challenged many times as he tries to change history.

In 11/22/63, you will find memorable characters  – who touch us viscerally and make us root for them – and a powerful sense of place and time, which is remarkably described in great detail about the stores, songs, clothes and cars found in 1958-’63 that make this fantasy seem plausible.

I don’t know if I can read anything else by Stephen King, this book was my first fictional read by him and it surpassed all of my reading expectations: made me laugh, made me nervous, and made me cry. I recognize that this type of book may not be for everyone, but if you are up for a “what if” historical tale, then this tome is for you.  image1P.S. Have you seen the series on hulu? I think I may start binge-watching it this weekend.

Summers on the fruit farm(s)

I love summer in Niagara: senses are heightened, weather is perfect, and the landscape is abundant with delicious colourful local food. Farm-to-table is an easy motto to adopt, as farmers’ markets pop up in busy locales and fruit stands decorate dreamy country roads. But for many Niagara-ites, farming isn’t just perfect Instagram pictures, or tasty treats, farming is life.

During the sticky humid summer months, there is no shortage of work for eager hands in Niagara as fruit farmers enthusiastically welcome as many labourers as they can acquire. With over 700 fruit farms in the Niagara Region and a tight time-frame to follow, help is needed, albeit arduous and exhausting, and the pay is, well you’re not going to become a millionaire, but the memories gained outweigh the negative.

Growing up, my summers were spent helping my dad in the vineyard and neighbouring farmers tend their fruit, as my own eager hands, in quick succession, worked in fields and barns pruning, picking and packing.

Let me preface, when I say eager, I mean told – I didn’t want to spend my summers working on farms. I wanted to laze around the pool, binge-watch television, gossip with girlfriends, but instead, was instructed by the authority figures (my parents) to get off my keister and work. I hated it! It was hard work, the hardest work my teenage body ever encountered, and it was boring, so very boring. I can’t tell you how many grapevines I have pruned, or the number of cherries I have picked, or the amount of apricots, peaches and plums I have packed. However, I can tell you the horror stories of what happens when you eat too many cherries, or the feel of peach fuzz on your skin after an eight-hour shift, or what happens to your nails after repeatedly rubbing them against the rubber conveyor belt.

Once I learned how to overcome the, shall we say, obstacles, it wasn’t that bad. I worked with great people, both locals and migrant workers, and shared laughs, meals and stories. It helped that my bff was there as well, which made the time slightly speed on by as we would tell tales, listen to audio books, and get and give advice, mostly on school, guys, and clothes – the priorities of teenage girls.

Those four summers spent working on fruit farms created the foundation of who I am today. I learned what it takes to be a hard worker, how to listen to others, and the importance of respect, followed by a greater appreciation for the fruits of our labour.

So buy local, not only does it taste better, it supports our local agricultural communities.IMG_4426PS. Have you been following the “The Hands That Feed Us” series in the St.Catharines Standard by Niagara-based writer, Tiffany Mayer?  If not, you really should!

The Nameless Widow

Needing a change of scenery from my drab writer’s den, I headed to a nearby coffee shop to do the detestable: type away on my name brand laptop with a $5 venti latte. However, providence intervened and my laptop stayed untouched.

After ordering my drink, and settling into a corner table, an older lady approached me with her coffee in hand and asked if she could join. I didn’t know how to respond as there were many empty tables, and I had my laptop open and wanted to, no scratch that, needed to finish a deadline. I hesitate before a polite “sure” escapes my mouth.

“Thanks, dear. The weather today is awful, I feel it seeping right into my bones,” she says as she methodically places her purse on the table followed by her teacup and unwinds the shawl she has around her neck and hair. She is wearing a delicate string of pearls, which beautifully complement her purple dress. Rings decorate every finger except her right pinky, and her blush matches the pink hue of her lipstick. I later learn that she had her hair done, a ritual she has adopted specifically for this date. “Today marks the fifth anniversary of my husband’s passing. I just came back from visiting him and I am not ready to walk into our empty home, even though it has been many years of emptiness.’

“I’m sorry,” I mumble. How else is one suppose to respond to death or death’s anniversary?

“Don’t apologize, dear. Death has a funny way of creeping up on us, stealing those we love, and sometimes acquiring the ones we no longer want.”

I take a sip of my coffee and casually assess my surroundings to see if anyone else in the shop has noticed this woman, or her talk of death. Everyone else is too immersed in their laptop or smart-phone to notice me or this woman.

“Please don’t misinterpret what I am saying, I loved George dearly, but sixty-four years is a long time to be with someone, and after awhile love just starts to feel like a routine. How old are you, my dear?” She asks as she takes her first sip of tea.

“Thirty,” I shyly reply, as if my age will reveal something I am not willing to share. She takes another sip and I am reminded of a fortuneteller I visited years ago in Toronto; she, along with that fortuneteller, appear to have the ability to look past my exterior armour and into my naked soul, to my secrets – secrets that bare no value to strangers.

“So young, but not really,” she states.

“I know,” I sigh. “Lately I have been dealing with my own insecurities of not being the person I envisioned I would be at thirty.”

“And what is that?” She asks.

“I don’t know. I just thought life would be different, it wouldn’t look like this. I’m happy and I’m loved, but there are days when I ask myself, ‘Okay, what is next?’”

“There is that word again, love. Do you let that word define you?”

I lean back into my chair, look directly into her eyes, and say “Yes, I do, but don’t we all?”

“That is where you falter, my dear. Love is ubiquitous – it’s always there inside of you, you just need to know how to ignite it yourself and not be dependent on someone else because sooner or later, that person will diminish that love.”

“I politely disagree,” I rebut. “Yes, you need to love yourself, but a person is allowed to equate happiness by being loved. Isn’t that what we all want: to love and be loved in return? Cliché, but true.”

“I often forget the banalities of love,” she states, almost as if she is pushing aside the significance of the action to love. “My parents arranged my marriage to George, I was eighteen, and he was 21. I was in my prime to marry and conceive,” she emphasized prime, as if prime was the only reason she married. “But nature had a different plan and left me childless for many years. I prayed to a god every night to give me a baby, more for George than for me, as he so badly wanted children and to be a father. I was impartial though, but I knew a man’s legacy must continue and if I didn’t give him children then he would have gone elsewhere, and he did, many times, and I turned a blind-eye, like a good housewife. We stayed married, and eventually my prayers were answered, like god took pity on me for abiding by my husband while he strayed. I gave birth to a girl and boy, exactly two years apart. Do you have any children?” She asks as she glances at my ring finger.

“I do not.”

“Sometimes it’s for the best.”

“My partner and I want children, we just don’t have any yet,” My response is a tad over-zealous, but I don’t want her to assume that we share a similarity, although a part of me feels an affinity towards her, as if our past lives somehow intertwined once.

“These days, you can never tell with women.” She takes another sip of her tea, which must now be lukewarm. She glances around the room and studies those around us, as if she’s looking for someone. “When I was your age we were married, our children were in school and our afternoons were spent drinking vodka martinis gossiping about the latest Hollywood scandal. Our only worry was making sure we were home in time to fetch the kids from school and to make sure that a proper meal was placed on the table for our husbands.”

“Do you regret it?” As soon as the words slip out of my mouth, I fear that I went too far.

“Not at all. That was the way of life; it was what we knew and how we lived. Mind you, it would have been fun if the roles were reversed and I was the one that left for work in the morning, shagged who I wanted in the afternoon, and returned home in the evening to my dotting family. But that’s just a lascivious dream.”

The bell over the café door chimes and we both turn to look.

“Oh, would you look at that, it’s Max, my driver. He must have been wondering what was taking me so long.”

She quickly gathers her things as Max walks towards us.

“It has been a pleasure talking to you, my dear,” she says as she stands up.

I mirror her actions and stand as well. “You too,” I politely respond.

I look down at my mug of coffee, half empty, and cold since it sat mostly untouched as I was too engrossed with the conversation to move my body to something so mundane as sipping coffee. I glance up and see the back of my acquaintance.

“Wait, I didn’t get your name.”

“That’s the funny thing about names, they ruin a person’s aura.” And with that she walked out of the door.

Adventure awaits in Banff National Park

If you’re looking for a ‘wild’ weekend adventure with your significant other or besties, but at a loss of ideas, look no further than Banff National Park. Majestic mountains, breathtaking turquoise waters, and wildlife await; canoe rides, cozy lodgings and countless hiking trails are in store; and, a city like no other to explore! This year is the perfect time to discover these natural wonders as we celebrate Canada’s 150th birthday. Bonus, Parks Canada passes are free in 2017 as a way to entice and invite locals near and far to explore Canada. Read on for five must-do experiences in Banff National Park; then plan your trip, pack your backpack and head to the magnificent mountains this summer. Disclaimer: Be prepared for an extreme case of wanderlust.

Camp in an oTENTik at Two Jack Lakeside
Sleep in a cozy cabin-tent at Two Jake Lakeside right on Lake Minnewanka. This A-frame structure is mounted on a raised wooden floor and includes a queen-size bed and living area. These spacious accommodations are exclusive to Parks Canada, require no set-up and are super cute! Stay in one for $120 a night.IMG_8425

Canoe on the emerald waters of Lake Louise
Canoeing is the quintessential Canadian experience, add in the Rocky Mountains and now you’re living the Canadian Dream. Paddle on the emerald water of Lake Louise, while being surrounded by mountains, trees and the Fairmount Chateau Lake Louise in the background – this iconic hotel dates back to 1890 and has welcomed many Hollywood elites, such as Marilyn Monroe and Alicia Silverstone, hello Clueless. Canoe rentals are available by the hour.   Screen Shot 2017-06-26 at 7.58.16 PM

Hike Moraine Lake
This glacier-fed lake is the gem of Banff! Moraine Lake is nestled amongst the Valley of the Ten Peaks, and is a sight to behold. Hike the many trails around the lake, but be bear aware, depending on the season some trails may be restricted or require groups of four or more. Make sure to climb the Rockpile Trail for the money shot of Moraine Lake and its tranquil turquoise water – this very image was on the twenty-dollar bill in 1969-’79.  Screen Shot 2017-06-26 at 8.01.39 PM

Town of Banff
Known as a Mountain Town, this legendary spot is the perfect place to shop for souvenirs, dine and sleep, if you want the luxury and privacy of a hotel suite. Each street in this quaint town offers different views of the mountains. Chat with locals, and ask for their recommendations, they’re the ones that know where to find those hidden gems. Warning: This Mountain Town will leave you dreaming of living in the mountains.Screen Shot 2017-06-26 at 8.14.02 PM.png

Banff Upper Hot Springs
After a day of exploring, relax and unwind in the Banff Upper Hot Springs. Soak in the natural hot springs mineral water, while gazing at snow-capped mountains and pine trees. This natural spa-like oasis has a small entry fee of $7. Definitely worth it! For a romantic vibe, go in the evening and watch the sunset.Screen Shot 2017-06-26 at 8.32.32 PM

Pro tip: Cruise through the Rocky Mountains in a Mustang Convertible – panoramic views on point. If timing permits drive the Icefields Parkway from Banff to Jasper – stretching 232 km, this is a road trip like no other with mountains, glaciers and sweeping valleys.IMG_7632

Quick Links
Parks Canada
Order your Parks Canada Pass
Stay in an oTENTik
Canoe rentals at the Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise
Tourism Banff
Banff Upper Hot Springs